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The Weekly Blog

A Two-Horse Race

That’s it. I’ve had enough. I’m leaving the party and becoming independent just like Anna Such-and-such, Thingy Smith and Chuka Um-wotsit.

We staged a two horse race at Kelso last week and there were a few people who didn’t like the result. It was something to do with the fact that the horse everyone assumed would win at the start, wasn’t the same horse that won at the end. Maybe, if we ran the race again, we’d get a different result.

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The Weekly Blog

Seventh Heaven

This week I received an omen of great fortune. One of those happy events that made me realise that the fates are casting warm rays of benevolence in my direction.

No, it wasn’t a lottery win. I didn’t even find a ten pound note down the back of the sofa, although that has happened to me once and it was a great feeling. But not as good as this…

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The Weekly Blog

Racing to Work

As a teenager, I would have loved to have skipped school and bunked off to the races. Sadly I wasn’t resourceful enough to enact a workable plan.

But for the past few years, the Racing To School charitable programme has been helping tens of thousands of pupils to break free of the classroom and experience a day at the races. Of course they haven’t been allowed to bet because the teachers come too…

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The Weekly Blog

Go to Jail!

I’ve recently bought racecourses at Goodwood, Newbury and York. I have also invested in new grandstands at Exeter and Catterick.

Sadly Kelso Racecourse does not feature on the Injured Jockeys Fund’s limited edition version of Monopoly. But if it did, I’m sure it would be more expensive than Ascot and Cheltenham, the two most costly properties on the board.

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The Weekly Blog

Something Simpler

The word ‘Resolution’ is derived from the Latin ‘Resolutionem’, meaning the process of reducing something into a simpler form.

In the 1540s the word was used to describe the sense of solving a problem; a few decades later it became the agreed outcome of a meeting. Not until the 1780s did resolutions become something that we made at New Year: intentions to make ourselves better people.

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